Woosh Washrooms

People will avoid certain brands like a bad smell… Don’t let yours be one of them.

No one wants to walk into a washroom that is unclean or missing essential consumables like soap and toilet paper; less still do visitors want to discover an unpleasant smell. Yet malodours are typically the first thing that are noticed by visitors when entering a washroom, setting the course for the remainder of a person’s visit.

We now know that visitors will use the state of a company’s washroom as a benchmark for a business, regarding those with poorly maintained assets and facilities as far less favourable to work with or buy from. Air quality is just one of a number of factors that has an influence on this vital first impression. In many ways, the entire washroom experience stands and falls with the quality of air care, making it one of the most critical features of washroom management, particularly for companies that take their visitors’ perception and overall reputation seriously.  

But why is smell such a big factor?
One answer to this question lies in the world of neuroscience. As an article in Psychology Today points out, the hippocampus, a region of the brain that regulates emotions, is now known as the site in which time-and-place ‘smell memories’ are encoded. This encoding process leaves individuals associating smells with a powerful ‘spatiotemporal’ moment which can be triggered when the individual again encounters an odour in similar or even completely different environments.

This process and the memories that are created are understood to be very difficult to alter or erase, making the washroom air quality challenge all the more important for businesses concerned with setting the right tone. The issue only takes on greater significance when factoring in the huge amount of research that suggests the lopsided power that bad memories have over good ones. In other words, if a visitor has had a bad washroom experience, particularly due to malodour, they are more likely to remember that time more vividly than other more positive occasions.

So how can you assure a positive experience?
And what are the pros and cons of the options available to businesses? Not all air fresheners were created equal and some are better suited to certain cases than others. Let’s take a look at them.   

First up is the aerosol auto-dispenser.
This is found across all different types of washrooms, particularly public loos as they are the most cost-effective way to eliminate bad smells. While these are definitely the most budget-friendly solution, the freshening smell that they dispense will disappear far quicker than other options on the market. They also have a higher impact on the environment. As such, aerosols are likely not the best option for businesses that bring lots of important clients into their offices, or for those that have green aspirations.

Secondly, you have reed diffusers.
These are now a staple in many homes but are increasingly being seen in the washroom environment. Reed diffusers are excellent at sustaining a fragrance, offering all manner of sophisticated smells that are not only easy on the eyes and nose but also friendly to the environment. The downside is their cost due to the heavy use of expensive essential oils and the need to buy multiples for larger washrooms. Businesses should also watch out for kit-style diffuser packs which will likely contain synthetic fragrances that are home to all manner of unsafe chemicals. Diffusers are excellent for executive-level offices and design-conscious companies that want to impress visitors no matter the cost.

Finally, you have cold air diffusers.
These are the most sophisticated option available to businesses yet also the most expensive. Much like reed diffusers, cold air diffusers are now becoming a staple of the modern home but are also being seen in greater numbers throughout the office and washroom environment. Nebulisers will atomise the essential oils that are most often added with water. This mixture is then propelled out of the unit, releasing whatever fragrance or essential oil has been chosen. Some of these products can be noisy, though many are designed to operate as quietly as possible. For Woosh these are a real winner, typically getting the best feedback from customers and visitors to our clients’ washrooms.  

Want to know more about air quality and washroom management excellence? Download our BLooprint here:

The BLooprint – The Facilities Manager’s Guide To Effective Washroom Management

Today marks the launch of our landmark guide for the facilities management industry.

As you may have guessed, this document, which will be the first edition of a series we’ve called the ‘BLooprint’, is all about washroom management – how it’s done, why it matters, and what the experts think. The premise of the BLooprint is simple: it looks to equip FMs with the knowledge they need in order to manage and maintain truly outstanding washrooms.

So, why have we written this? Having engaged with notable industry figures like Martin Pickard, Beth Goodyear and Liz Kentish, we found that there was a gap in knowledge that needed filling. These three contributors showed us that a go-to guide would be ideal for FMs looking to raise the standard of their facilities, especially for those who are new to the profession and unsure of best practice.

As conversations with the three contributors progressed, it became clear that washrooms are an often overlooked yet critically important aspect of an FM’s remit, with little direction or advice out there in the public domain. This is ultimately why we have started the BLooprint series. We believe this edition will provide FM professionals with the final word on how to achieve washroom excellence.

Granted, there are bigger things in life than washrooms and it should be a given that they are properly cared for. All too often, however, building users are let down and have to put up with less than satisfactory facilities. This needs to change.  

Let’s put this in perspective. The typical office worker pops to the loo around three to four times a day. For an average-sized facility, that’s over 1.1 million complaint opportunities per year – and that’s leaving aside other visitors and important guests. What if instead these visits were opportunities to leave a positive impact? With edition one of the BLooprint series to hand, this becomes a far more realistic target. It gives readers the advice they need to fundamentally change how their washrooms are managed, dramatically increasing the chances of turning a potentially bad impression into a wholly positive one.

Research has found that a bad washroom experience has a profoundly negative impact on the perception of an organisation, with visitors being far less likely to spend time or money with a company that has a poorly maintained building and facilities. “Toilets are a touchstone of building,” says FM ‘guru’ Martin Pickard, “if you want to know whether a building is being cared for or not, go in the loo, and you can just tell whether somebody’s got their handle of this place and are looking after it properly.”

It’s not just reputational damage that results from poor washrooms, though. Consider the financial impact that it can also have. In 2016 alone, there were an estimated 137 million working days lost due to sickness or injury – and that’s just the UK. As Pickard again goes on to highlight the “obvious yet decidedly ignored connection between washroom hygiene and a company’s profit margins.”

Management is one thing; effective management is another. We recognise the FM industry’s tendency to prefer data and ‘hard facts’, which is why there’s a quantitative approach to accompany the opinions of our FM luminaries. Taking on board both the qualitative and the quantitative approaches, readers will be able to build a clearer picture of how a washroom functions, how it impacts an organisation, and what needs to be done to see it sparkle all year round.

Winter Washroom Management

For many, businesses and landlords, winter is often the most challenging season and none more so than for those who are tasked with looking after built assets. Washrooms in particular face the most strain during colder and wetter months, with the increased incidence of cold and flu making them hot (or should that be cold?) beds for the spread germs and bacteria. Heavier rain, ice and dampness also create the perfect conditions for mould and other nasties to spread if facilities are not managed effectively.

It’s not just the spread of bacteria, however, that cause issues for washrooms during winter periods. Heavy rains also allow floors to become sodden trip hazards, and visitors’ footwear can bring in all kinds of debris from the road, especially rock salt that is used in the evenings to reduce the spread of ice on roads and pavements. Without careful maintenance of a washroom facility during winter, organisations can quickly find themselves with a damaged – and not to mention highly dangerous environment to contend with.

Increased humidity and standing water brought in during winter periods can also lead to unpleasant odours in the washroom. For businesses that are regularly bringing in clients and other important people to their offices, this kind of scenario can, as research shows, really put people off an organisation. As our blog on Air Fresheners discussed, it’s a first impression that can be incredibly difficult to change.  

So, what can be done? Luckily, with the right knowledge and understanding all these winter challenges can be solved. Our previous blog on cold and flu season equips organisations with the knowledge they need to fight back against common viruses and bacteria found in bathroom environments (which typically peak during colder weather). Soap dispensers, sanitisers, correct cleaning chemicals, hand towels vs. paper towels – all this and more can be found in the first edition of the BLooprint which is due to be released mid-February.

As for reducing debris and standing water within the washroom environment, it’s often more than simply running a mop over the floor throughout the day. Some of the best equipped washrooms now have specially designed textile and non-textile matting placed at entrances and exits to keep foreign objects out of the bathroom, helping to reduce damage on the flooring and, most importantly, keep the environment more hygienic.

Finally, keeping a washroom smelling fresh and pleasant during winter need not be an added hassle. As our previous blog on air fresheners showed, there are now a range of air care options available to businesses at different price points that not only keep restrooms smelling fragrant but also help to elevate the standard of an organisation’s built assets.

The ‘BLooprint’ – our landmark document for effective washroom management – will show that washrooms are often considered the touchstone of a building, prefacing the entire building experience for visitors. FM ‘guru’ Martin Pickard, a self-confessed toilet obsessive, regards the washroom as the single place which indicates whether or not an organisation has its affairs in order. Of course, getting a washroom clean is one thing; putting a strategy in place, especially during winter months, is another. This is why we’ve created the BLooprint. It gives readers a handy reference for everything washroom management, allowing facilities to shine no matter the weather.

Look out for the ‘BLooprint – Edition 1 The Facilities Manager’s Guide To Effective Washroom Management.’ Chat to one of our Wooshologists if you’d like to get your eyes on a copy today.

If you’d like more advice on best practice during the colder months and the management of your washroom facilities, speak to a Wooshologist on 0203 876 5616 or email hello@wooshwashrooms.com

Flu season… An expensive season for some businesses.

Autumn and winter signals many things: the changing of the seasons, leaves falling off the trees, receding daylight and, of course, Christmas. But the long cold nights also bring with them an increased incidence of cold and flu. Indeed, for many, the move from autumn into winter marks the beginning of ‘cold and flu season’.

Public washrooms are often considered a main offender in the spread of cold and flu. It’s hardly surprising when you consider just how many people use these facilities day to day. They are often cramped, poorly ventilated rooms with little in the way of infection prevention. Thousands of people breath in the same air and make use of the same fixtures – toilet roll holders, sinks, soaps, towels, taps and so on. It seems like only a matter of time before a visitor picks up something. 

According to the Centre for Economic and Business Research, absences from work equate to losses of around £18bn in the UK every single year – and that number looks sets to rise to a staggering £26bn by 2030. 

While the common cold and influenza virus only make up a portion of that figure – minor illnesses accounted for 24.8% of all sickness absences in 2016 – the numbers still demonstrate a need for diligence from both individuals and the people who manage public restrooms.

Cold and flu viruses are mainly spread via coughs and sneezes. Poorly cleaned surfaces also pose a risk, especially when an infected person touches something and hasn’t washed their hands thoroughly. Colds usually go away by the themselves, but flu can be much more serious and is thought to result in the deaths of around 500,000 people worldwide each year. 

Because these viruses are mutating all the time, it’s almost impossible for some to immunise people fully. Vaccines help those that are most vulnerable, but no inoculation is comprehensive to guarantee full protection.

Research has shown that viruses can survive on surfaces for up to 24 hours. This means a person who coughs or splutters in the washroom is highly likely to pass on their illness to another visitor. And, of course, the more people that use a washroom, the more likely it is that an infection will spread. Somewhat alarmingly, medical literature has also revealed that germs spread through the air via hand dryers and toilet flushes. 

Unsurprisingly, in this study bacteria were found in much higher quantities within public washroom environments, with sinks and handles proving the worst offenders. Human immune systems are very good at combating the worst of these nasties but, as Dr Nuala O Connor, GP says “Washing your hands is one of the easiest ways to protect yourself and others from getting sick with vomiting, diarrhoea, coughs, colds, sore throat, flu, in fact almost all infections.”

Thorough hand washing is, and always will be, the first line of defence for fighting cold and flu. There are, however, many things that washroom management provider can do to join the fight. Beyond meticulous and well managed cleaning rotas, owners can install automatic systems to reduce the need for individuals to touch surfaces. 

Enclosed dispensers will also eliminate having to fumble around in search of consumables. Hand hygiene facilities should be made widely available to eliminate infection at source.  

Get in touch with us to see how else we can help turn the tide against cold and flu in your workplace. Or take a look at our range of hygiene products and dispensing solutions here.

People have been talking about your washroom. Isn’t it time you listened?

We hear more and more about how we look, how we dress and how we do our hair. Image, image, image. This means we’re all a little bit more worried about our appearance, but does this rub off onto our surroundings, like our washrooms for example? Apparently not. According to a survey taken by Bradley Corporation, there is increasing dissatisfaction with washrooms.

Here’s a little fact for you facilities managers out there:

‘87% of British people say that having a bad washroom experience leads to a bad impression of your establishment!’

This was a survey of 8,000 people (not just the guy down at the local moaning over a pint). If you break it down a bit you can see that 6,960 of the people asked believed a good washroom really was important. No more thinking: “Having a good washroom isn’t really relevant for my organisation” and a lot more of: “If my washroom is great my organisation will be great too.”

When people were asked to express the key solutions to a clean washroom guess what came out on top?

Toilet paper! A nonnegotiable necessity- don’t you think. Enough said.

• Next was soap. Needed to make your hands squeaky clean, and stop all the nasty germs from hanging around.

• The third was paper towels these really are super-duper important and key in saying ‘bye-bye’ to residual contamination (that’s tech speak for the little critters that like to make you ill). With all those germs gone your staff spend less time sick at home in their PJ’s, and more time at work actually being staff.

Hand sanitiser came next on the list. Surprised? Don’t be. As a Wooshologist, I can tell you it’s becoming a ‘must have’ with our clients. In fact, 8 out of 10 people expect to find hand sanitiser in washrooms. (Want to know more? click here)

• Last on the list, but still rated as highly important is the humble hand drier. Known for dead-fast drying these bad boys will get everyone back at their desks working before you can say ‘Rumpelstiltskin’.

A whopping 77% of British respondents said they would rather not use a washroom if it was dirty and smelly! Over 50% said a bad smell would leave a poor impression. If only they knew it took a simple air freshener or air purifier and all their woes would be gone.

Washrooms are not always given the highest priority and we want to know why. Toilets can make a significant difference on the overall impression your organisation makes on staff and, perhaps more importantly customers! That is, if the toilets are sparkling, smell fresh as a daisy and allow for people to be as clean as a bean after using them. Otherwise, the first impression of your building won’t be as great- and we all know first impressions count.

Want to upgrade your washroom grime scene to a gleam scene? Request a call with a Wooshologist using our chat system or call 0800 206 2110.

Oh, and join us on social media to, we’d love to hear from you.

Follow us on Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Written by Ashlyn-Jane

Hand Sanitiser Hacks…it’s more useful than you think!

Hand Sanitiser Hacks... it's more useful than you think! small

Many of us use hand sanitiser, or at least have a tube lurking in our bags!

Let me tell you why…

‘80% of common infections can be spread through hands’.

That’s why.

While proper handwashing technique is a vital part of keeping yourself healthy, good old soap and water aren’t always around when you need them (say, when you get an unexpected hug from a runny-nosed pre-schooler on the playground).

That’s where alcohol-based sanitisers come to the rescue. We recommend hand sanitisers that contain between 60 and 80 percent alcohol, this is because they work the best (in other words- exterminate the most germs, they won’t be back). When you’re out and about, and not near a sink, hand sanitisers are the perfect go-to!

If your hands aren’t actually covered with visible dirt, the best way to clean them is to use hand sanitiser, says James Scott, a microbiologist at the University of Toronto. “A sanitiser cleans your hands much better than soap and water, so it reduces the bacterial burden to a much greater extent,” he says. “And your hands tend to stay cleaner longer than if you were to compare with regular hand washing.”

We recommend you scrub your hands thoroughly using soap and water (if a sink is available!), a little guide is to sing happy birthday twice while you wash (it’s entirely up to you whether you do this in your head or out loud). Check out this infographic which shows you how you should be washing your hands.  After germ and visible dirt busting it’s time to prolong the bacteria-free status of your hands. Squirt a generous dollop of hand sanitiser into the palm of your hand and rub together. It should take around 15 seconds for them to dry, if it doesn’t take that long, you may not have used enough sanitiser. You would have heard of the expression ‘less is more’ right? But there is an exception to every rule and hand sanitiser is that exception.

OK, we know sanitiser is awesome on your hands, but did you know about these little hacks:

• Do you use makeup brushes? Imagine the dirt they collect from your skin! You’ve guessed, hand sanitiser can be used to clean the bristles on your brushes limiting the spread of bacteria! Brilliant.

• Ever spilt something on your white shirt JUST before an important meeting, hand sanitiser can help! Apply a blob onto the stain and let soak in, then scrub and repeat until the stain has vanished, genius! Of course, we don’t want to be responsible for ruining your Gucci goods, so test on a small unnoticeable patch first.

• 95% of mobile phones have bacteria on! Some say our phones have more diverse types of bacteria than a loo seat- seriously guys! We touch money, door handles, other people, keyboards, food…and then… we reach for our phones. It’s no wonder they’re breeding ground for nasty germs and grease. A small squirt of sanitiser onto a tissue, perfect for de- griming our phones.

• If you wear glasses, like me, you’ll know the real issue of smeary and greasy specs! Everyone I know who has glasses gets fed up of peering through grimy lenses. Apply sanitiser to the lenses and rub with a soft cloth. Be sure to clean the frames too, even if you really do believe your nose is squeaky clean.

• Public toilets- everybody’s out-and-about nightmare. Whether you’re a nest builder, like to hover or just steer clear. Here’s your number one sanity saver when it comes to avoiding getting bacteria on your bum! Sanitiser can be applied to the loo seat with some tissue, once it’s dried you can be safely seated to do your deed. Simple!

• Got a pesky pimple rearing its nasty head? Stop that sucker in its tracks with…you guessed again…hand sanitiser. A little (as in teeney weeney) dab on the crime scene will help dry the pimple out and bash-up the bacteria. What more could you want. While a few Wooshologists have tried this- with no adverse effects, we do recommend you consult your GP first. Just in case.

• You’ve got a lovely glass bowl and you start to peel off the label…oh that step isn’t so simple. Peel is the wrong word – more like pick, scrub and scratch. Even if you’re triumphant in removing the label, you’re often left with an icky patch that is quite comfortable where it is, thank you very much. Bingo! This is where we get a bit of sanitiser which kicks ass and allows you to wipe away the sticky residue! Stress free label removing. Check. Oh and you get to keep your nails in tack too.

So now you’re wondering how to get hold of this stuff, or you should be anyway!

Thankfully, we’ve got you covered.

Give a Wooshologist a call on 0800 206 2110 and check out some of the options below…

Hand Sanitiser productsWoosh_9

Written by Ashlyn-Jane

The History of the Toilet…flushing since 1956

 

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Next time you pull, prod or push the chain, button or leaver to flush the toilet…just pause a moment! And contemplate the creation of the humble loo.

Ok, so you may not hold it in such high esteem as the impressive invention of the aeroplane, space rocket or satellite but here at Woosh we would like to make the argument that quietly the toilet is a master piece of design and has transformed the world we live in.

2800BC (give or take a few years) was an interesting era for the evolution of the toilet. Houses were being designed with lavatories built into the outer walls of houses, made of stone or wood. They had vertical chutes, through which waste could fall hygienically into the street drains or cesspits below. But this advanced and sophisticated luxury was only for the well-to-do.

If fate had you born into the working classes, then old pots and open pits was your lot. And if pooping in a pot or pit wasn’t bad enough, you could chuck in an unhealthy dose of diarrheaintestinal worm infections,  typhoidcholerahepatitispolio, and trachoma. Yes, and all you did was go to the toilet, oh and had a drink of water from the river- which just happened to be the sewer works from the village up stream. Oh no… you won’t find any of the Woosh team getting all nostalgic for the years gone by.

Now the Romans had it sorted, in fact, some of their toilets, plumbing and sewers weren’t that far removed from what we might be familiar with today. To give credit where credit is due, it was organized effort to keep things ship shape. This said a law had to be passed to protect innocent bystanders from assault by wastes thrown into the streets. The Romans also had a novel approach to public toilets. Again they were organised, some being free and others a small charge but the odd thing is, whether intentionally or not, they became places to socialise. Now we know the expression- ‘when in Rome, do as the Romans do’ but seriously! A number 2 and a good chin-wag with your buddies? We draw the line.

Fast forward few hundred bog years and you’re into the Middle Ages (not the mid-life crises years of your 40’s but the medieval period!) where garderobes where the ‘in’ thing. Apart from sounding like an expensive shawl for the wealthy to wear their alfresco summer cocktail parties, the concept of answering natures call hadn’t really moved on in leaps and bounds. The toilet was found in similar form as 2800BC just on the ramparts of giant castles where chutes channeled any waste tumbling with considerable velocity to the ground below where on impacted splatted any person or object unfortunate enough to be within range.

As could be imagined (or maybe better not) the pong was ghastly. As a result, toilets were strategically placed away from the bedroom’s but conveniently located near the kitchens to ensure that when doing your No.1 or No.2 you were kept comfortably warm. OK! We get the warm bit; we can see the thought process
here but it’s the thought of an open toilet system snuggled next to the kitchen that we
find a little disconcerting.

Wooshing forward a few more hundred bog years we find a man with the most unfortunate name, Thomas Crapper although he can’t claim the credit for inventing the flushing toilet, (that award goes to John Harrington in the 1500s) Mr. Thomas Crapper can take the credit for the widespread usage of sanitary plumbing and pioneered the concept of bathroom fitting showrooms!

The origin of the slang word, cr*p, did indeed come from Sir Thomas Crapper himself because of his association with lavatories. One version of the story is that during World War I an American serviceman stationed in England saw his name on the cisterns and used it as army slang ‘I’m going to the crapper’… and the rest, as they say…is history.

 

The whole concept of a room dedicated for personal hygiene and grooming is a more recent one. Most of the houses built before the turn of the century didn’t have bathrooms. So, in the span of about 100 years, the modern bathroom has evolved from a novelty into an almost-universal fixture. And jolly grateful we are for that too.

This is where our augment stacks up. The toilet is right up there with the design greats like airplanes and rockets in our eyes- perhaps a little higher.

Consider: How often do you fly? When was the last time you hopped on a rocket? And yet as humans we use the toilet 2500 times a year. Now multiply that by the population of your office, town or city! Yep- we’ll let you do the math but it if wasn’t for the good old lavatory we would live in a stinking, disease ridden world (even more than it is today).

So we rest our case, the toilet is truly one of the greatest inventions.

Whats your views? Get in contact via social media, we’d love to hear from you. Join us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

How to lower your sick day expenditure: it’s easy!

 

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Many people admit, that the lengths they go to try and avoid washroom germs can be a little extreme!

Let me ask you a question…How do you flush the loo when out and about? Odd as the question may seem, allegedly two-thirds of people flush the toilet with their feet. Yes, you did read that right. With their feet! The other third use toilet tissue, skip the flush altogether or gingerly flush with elbow or fingertips.

Do you swear by the ‘Office Bathroom Drill’? Wash hands. Dry hands. Use paper towel to open door. Manoeuvre elbow, leg or hip to move door. Then return to your desk, skin untouched by germs. Hopefully.

The ‘only live once, carefree, daredevil’ washroom users that do decide to flush the toilet ‘normally’, may as well have cartwheeled down London’s super sewer. The germs prowling around down there are not the sort you want to meet in the dark, or anytime for that matter.

The toilet and toilet flush are always accused of being the bad boys in the bathroom hygiene scene. But what if we were the bad boys (and girls) and didn’t wash our hands properly? Touching the flusher is one issue, washing your hands is another. Maybe you are one of those people that don’t use your feet to flush the toilet, instead use that thing called a hand, to grab the handle and flush. Well, congratulations for using it in the correct way- but you now have your very own germ factory right there on your hands. The warmth and natural moisture of your mitts, is the perfect environment for mass production.

Wash your hands! A squirt of soap. Feebly rub hands together. Quick rinse under a trickle of water. Run them under a hand dryer (or rub
on trousers) and good to go! Simples.

Hang on, hang on. These are germs we’re talking about. Big, nasty, bad germs that can have you tucked up in bed before you can say “Woosh Washrooms”.

Washing hands properly is super-duper important. You should be washing your hands for about 15 seconds minimum or the time it takes you to sing happy birthday twice (in your head, please)! This should include between your fingers, your nails, the backs of your hands and thumbs! You’d be surprised how many of these places are missed when washing hands.
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Just ponder long enough to consider everyone you interact with. Do they wash their hands? Don’t they wash their hands? You can just imagine the germ ‘rave’ going on in the average UK office. Humans are perfect germ transportation machines.

£18 billion. YES! £18 Billion was the UK expenditure on sick days in 2013! That’s a heck of a lot of wonga just because people are ‘too busy’ to spend 15 seconds on washing their hands. But seriously, 15 seconds, to save £18 billion. Doesn’t seem a bad little deal. And even if money isn’t your thing then who wants to be sick for days or even weeks a year?

Maybe you think this germ thing is being over-egged a bit, but listen to this – 80% of all common infections (yes this includes the dreaded cold/flu) can be spread by hands. Germy hands.

If you can eliminate the spread of germs by hands, you can minimise sick days. Any loyal self-respecting employee, health and safety diligent facilities manager or cost conscious boss would want that.

The common cold and flu is always doing the rounds of schools and offices- to avoid it you’d have to be living under a rock. Causing havoc with your sinuses, ruining your throat and making everyone’s heads pound and ache with fever. Picture this – you sneeze, reach for a tissue, and dab your dripping nose. You screw the tissue up (rubbing snot and saliva all over your hands, by the way). You then dispose of it in your bin (not a mini tissue mountain on the corner of the desk, we hope) and crack on with your work. You then touch your mouse, keyboard, phone and the pile of paperwork for your manager and also hand back a colleague’s pen that you pinched by mistake earlier. You have just started a chain of contamination. Well done! Germs from your hands are rocking and rolling all over the office. Watch that little sick day expenditure bar chart sneaking up- sky hiiiiiigh.

That is why hand sanitiser is an office must have. To find out the multiple benefits of this wonder product you can read our hand sanitiser facts article.

Sanitising, or Wooshing your hands as we like to call it, can nail those germs you may have missed in your 15 second/two-rounds-of-happy-birthday hand washing as well as any nasties you may have picked up on your way back to your desk. We recommend using enough to keep your hands wet for 15 seconds before they start to dry.  Combine a thorough hand wash with a good Wooshing of hand sanitiser afterwards and you’ll take squeaky clean to a whole new level.

With bacteria and germs lurking at every corner we would like to recommend a desktop Wooshing kit. A super sanitising set which gives you a mini hand sanitiser, a desktop sanitiser and your very own e-cloth. This kit is capable of blasting germs off both your hands and your desk/mouse/keyboard, meaning you can be germ-free and so can your office. We also have other exciting air purifying machines, these are super clever and make everything in your office 99.9% germ-free and proven by the NHS to lower sick day expenditure.

If you recognise the effects hand-hygiene has on your whole office and are serious about lowering your sick day expenditure get in contact with a Wooshologist on 0800 206 2110 or drop us an email hello@wooshwashrooms.com.

Written by Ashlyn-Jane